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CommunicationDifficult peopleResiliency & attitude

3 tips to survive holiday get-togethers

By December 20, 2017 December 6th, 2019 3 Comments

Let’s face it, holiday time can be stressful. And what makes it even worse is the requisite crossing of paths with certain friends and family members. Holidays can be fraught with emotion and that can lead to tempers running high, things being said, and relationships forever changed or worse yet, ruined.

Watch the video for tips:

To get the most out of your holiday season, use these 3 tried and proven ways to ensure your relationships are preserved.

TIP #1) TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF.

If you’re depleted, exhausted, tired, your defenses are weakened and chances are greatly increased that you’re going to say or do something you normally wouldn’t — something you’ll regret. Don’t take that chance. Be sure to take care of yourself, get enough rest, and don’t stretch yourself too thin. Self-care isn’t selfish, it’s selfless because when you care for yourself, you don’t become a burden to others. And you don’t live with regret. Words spoken in frustration and exhaustion will never be unheard.

TIP #2) LOSE THE BOOZE

You may be able to normally tolerate uncle Joe’s irritating snort when he laughs or cousin Timmy’s sarcastic jabs. You typically do a spendid job at tactfully asserting yourself and drawing boundaries, or remaining silent when that’s the best choice. However, introduce liquor into the picture, and the results could vary wildly. Limit your beverages and keep control over your tongue. My rule of thumb is one drink per hour, followed by one glass of water the following hour. This approach not only keeps you hydrated, it keeps your relationships.

TIP #3) GRACEFULLY EXIT

Before you snap back a response you know will incite the other person, exit the conversation. Either bite your tongue and don’t engage or, if that’s not possible, politely extricate yourself from the exchange. Suddenly you realize your glass is empty and you excuse yourself to recharge your vessel. Perhaps you even offer to refill the offending party’s glass too. Or a potty break. Or you see someone you want to chat with. Or your spouse needs a hand in the kitchen. Or whatever excuse is genuine and can gracefully remove you from the temptation to respond. Get out, now.

Try out these 3 tips

There you go. Whether it’s at family get-togethers or office parties, I hope these 3 tips help you during your holiday festivities. Have any others to suggest? Post below and let me know. Always a delight to hear from you.

Here’s to communication to get better, faster, easier results,
Marion Grobb Finkelstein
WORKPLACE COMMUNICATION CONSULTANT
Marion@MarionSpeaks.com
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“Marion Grobb Finkelstein, Workplace Communication Consultant, travels across Canada to help business people and organizations communicate in the workplace to get better, faster, easier results. She can help you too. Marion@MarionSpeaks.com 289-969-7691 www.MarionSpeaks.com OPT-IN to Marion’s Workplace Communication Tips enews at www.marionspeaks.com/tips

3 Comments

  • Hey there, it’s Marion Grobb Finkelstein here. What did you think of this article? Post your response in this blog and I’ll respond. Looking forward to hearing how these tips work for you.

  • Susan Russell says:

    Very good advice,Marion! It’s so hard to bite your tongue and gracefully walk away with some people/topics of conversation. For me it takes lots of “self-talk” to make it through lol. Thanks so much

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